• Multimedia

    Videos

    • Food Fraud and the Security of the Global Food Supply (2013, The Current with Mike Finnerty, Canadian Broadcast Corporation, February 22, 2013. Interview of John Spink, [24:00 total]
    • Improving Food Safety in the US (2013), Inside Story program, Al Jazeera Americas, Al Jazeera Global News Network, January 10, 2013. Interview of John Spink (broadcast to 269 million homes in over 100 countries). [Food Fraud is on at14:45/25:00]
    • Combating Food Fraud (2012), U.S. Pharmacopeia. Interview of John Spink [Video, 4:18 total]
    • Spink, J. (2012) Food Fraud Outreach – MOOC Madness, FoxFire 2012, MSU Global, Michigan State University, November 6, 2012. Presentation by John Spink [Video, 4:22 total]
    • Counterfeit Products: Bad for the Economy, Bad for Michigan.  DSE-TV presents the IPPSR (Institute for Public Policy & Social Research) meeting that took place on January 16, 2013 at the Michigan State University. This segment includes John Spink focusing on the IPPSR Spring Policy Forum. [Video, 9:40 total]

    Print Media Coverage

    • Is it the real thing?” Independent [London, England] 10 Feb. 2011: 14. InfoTrac Newsstand. Web. 20 Feb. 2011.
      • “Though food fraud can take a variety of forms – from brand counterfeiting to “honey laundering” [falsely claiming that a product, often Chinese honey, comes from somewhere else to justify a higher price] – all follow the single principle of misleading consumers for financial gain,” says Dr John Spink, associate director of the Michigan State University anti-counterfeit and product protection program, who is working to define food fraud’s threat to public health.
      • “Every time there’s an exchange of goods and services along the food supply chain there’s an opportunity for fraud – when food passes from producer to processor, or from manufacturer to distributor,” he explains.
      • “Though expert perception is that the volume is probably the same per head of the population it has been since Roman fraudsters watered down wine, globalisation and our growing willingness in the West to pay a premium for certain products has made food fraud a pressing concern.”
      • Investigations and disincentives such as fines or prison sentences are all fine and well, but the key to beating the problem is ensuring food fraud doesn’t pay, says Dr Spink: “The biggest disincentive is making it hard for them to make money out of it. Which is why my advice to anyone is: identify suppliers and brands and retailers with a clear, vested interest in keeping customers happy and encouraging repeat purchases.”
    • Layton, L. (2010). At US Dinner Tables, The Food May Be A Fraud, The Washington Post, Washington, DC, March 30, National Edition, Section 1, Page A01. (This was syndicated by over 4,000 news agencies including the Seattle Times and Dallas Morning News.)
      • “John Spink, an expert on food and packaging fraud at Michigan State University, estimates that 5 to 7 percent of the U.S. foods supply is affected but acknowledges the number could be greater.” We know what we seized at the border, but we have no idea what we didn’t seize,” he said.”
    • Clifford, S. (2010). In A Downturn, Even Knockoffs Go Downscale, The New York Times, Sunday, National Edition, Section 1, Page A01. (This was syndicated to over 7,000 news agencies.)
      • “”If there is demand, there will be supply,” said John Spink, associate director of the Anti-Counterfeiting and Product Protection Program at Michigan State University. In China, he said, “It’s all of a sudden them saying, ‘We have capacity. What can we make?’ “
    • Huffstutter, PJ. (2010). Ex-Owner of SK Foods Indicted in Tomato Scandal. Los Angeles times, Los Angeles, February 19, Business Section, B01
      • “Fraudulent practices in the food sector are a long-standing problem; they include processors or distributors misbranding products or conspiring to inflate prices that trickle down to the consumer, said John Spink, a food-fraud expert at Michigan State University. But most people aren’t aware that such practices happen and don’t even think to look out for them, he said.” “”Food used to be moved around regionally,” Spink said.” Now, there’s so much product moving so fast around the world and little oversight, particularly in other countries. Fraud in food has become a small side-effect of globalization.””
    • Interlandi, J. (2010). The Fake Food Detectives. Newsweek (online).
      • ‘”Products are moving around the world so fast now that there is just ample opportunity,” says John Spink, a food-fraud expert at Michigan State University. “And the demand for inexpensive food virtually guarantees that the problem will persist and grow.” […] But Spink says that monitoring everything isn’t necessary. “What we need to do is focus on the chemistry of the crime,” he says. “That means understanding the fraudsters themselves—who they are, what their motivations are, and how they find their opportunities.” And according to Spink, we’ve got a long way to go: “Based on our understanding of food fraud, the FDA is doing a fine job of dealing with it. But the problem is, we really don’t understand it all that well.”’
    • Interviewed for TV, radio, and print by the likes of: CNN, ABC World News Tonight, ABC Good Morning Today, Canadian Broadcast System, NBC Chris Hansen Presents, USA Today, New York Times, Washington Post, San Francisco Examiner, Newsweek, Business Week Magazine, LA Times, Associated Press, Reuters, Authentication News, Journal of Brand Protection, Ivanhoe Broadcasting (fed local TV station programs in Nashville, Tampa, and Los Angeles), Women’s Health, Scholastic Magazine, Security Management (ASIS), Scholastic, Wall Street Journal, Al Jezeera’s Insight Today, and others.